R2A seeks Guest Editors

6 October 2014

Research to Action (R2A) is excited to announce the launch of a new quarterly Guest Editor position. Applications are now open for Guest Editors who will have editorial responsibility over content displayed on the website for a four month period.

This is a fantastic opportunity to showcase the work of a project or programme around research uptake, the work an organisation is doing to raise the profile and uptake of its research or simply to build and share your expertise on a certain topic. R2A aims to raise the profile of underexplored areas within the field of research engagement and uptake and enhance the way research feeds into policy and practice. It is widely read by a varied audience and is frequently referenced within the development sphere.

Successful applicants will be expected to produce or commission five original pieces within a four month period. This content will centre on a specific topic and should aim to shape or add-value to the discourse around this focal area. Collections of content can take multiple formats; suggested outputs include but are not limited to: podcasts ,videos, webinars, interviews, blog posts and surveys.

If you or your team have an idea that you would like to find a platform for, get in touch via info@researchtoaction.org. Applicants should complete the short R2A Guest Editor Proposal form.

R2A appoints first Guest Editor (but we need more!)

The first Guest Editor will be Laura ffrench-Constant, whose work will centre on Policy Influence. Laura is currently studying for a degree in Politics and Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh, and has over the last 3 years working as an intern with CommsConsult Ltd – an organisation that works closely in the field of research communication and uptake.

Laura’s focus during her tenure will be on the difficulties practitioners face when trying to translate their research into policy. A ‘ How To’ guide on writing Policy Briefs will be accompanied by a blog entitled ‘What If’ which will address some of the obstacles that researchers and organisations face when attempting to influence policy.

Laura will also blog on the topic of alternative policy briefs, discussing whether complementary or truly alternative formats will surpass the time tested concept of the policy brief. Other issues she will explore are what policy makers want from researchers and how to track policy influence using altmetrics.

We very much look forward to Laura’s editorial oversight over the coming months and would like to wish her the best of luck!